Recent Press

Expert Tips on Marriage and Personal Finance

An interview with MoneyGeek
Wednesday, 03 November 2021

Expert Tips on Marriage and Personal Finance

Many people promise their partners to love and to cherish one another for richer or for poorer. Yet many skip the financial part of the vows and avoid talking about money, leading to trouble in the relationship. A CNBC survey found 56% of divorced Americans said they never talked about their finances with family members.

Not talking about finances eventually leads to arguing about it. Multiple studies and surveys show arguing about money is strongly correlated to divorce. While the topic can feel taboo, discussing money can lead to a better marriage.

Because finances in marriage can make or break a relationship, MoneyGeek created a playbook for couples to take control of their shared finances and build a strong partnership for the future.

Add Value by Discussing Encore Careers With Clients

Start the conversation early and use tools that help identify their thoughts and feelings about work.
Monday, 01 November 2021

Add Value by Discussing Encore Careers With Clients

The Coronavirus crisis has been a turning point for many people, with 76% of Americans crediting the pandemic with forcing them to “refocus on what’s most important in life.” This sentiment holds true across age, gender, race/ethnicity, income and region of the country. One option that has long been enthusiastically embraced by some of our clients, and magnified by the pandemic, is to begin an “encore career.” It also presents a planning opportunity as we work with our clients.

College Savings 101

Paying your child's tuition can seem like a daunting task, but deliberate planning can make it possible. By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA

Monday, 21 September 2020

College Savings 101

College expenses always seem to be on the rise and saving for your child’s tuition can feel like a herculean task at times. Accumulated College Board data for the 2019-2020 academic year showed an average cost of $21,950 as an in-state student at a state school, and a massive $49,870 for a private school. A bit of math easily reveals that four years at any college or university will cost a pretty penny, especially if your children aren’t close to college age just yet. In fact, tuition is likely to continue rising at a rate of about 8 percent each year, and assuming cost trends continue, parents and prospective students will face steep tuition bills in the future.

While not all parents are able to or want to pay for their child’s entire college education, many feel it’s important to contribute at least partially if they can. With rather alarming annual increases in costs, however, parents who wish to help put their children through college need to start planning and saving now. As with any large financial burden, the more time you spend saving, the lower the financial burden is at any given time.

Women Entrepreneurs: How to Sustain Your Balancing Act

Female Business Owners Can Find Success by Focusing Their Attention on Key Areas By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA

Monday, 24 August 2020

Women Entrepreneurs: How to Sustain Your Balancing Act

Being a female entrepreneur is rife with challenges. We still live in a world where women business owners are defying social expectations, struggling to be taken seriously, and confronting the difficult balance between business life and personal life. It’s no wonder so many female entrepreneurs feel like they’re constantly hustling and still not reaching their goals while confronting the challenge to access funding as a woman-owned business, building a professional network, and overcoming the fear of failure.

If you love what you do – and you’re good at it – but you feel overwhelmed with all that’s required of you, you’re not alone. Read on for three tips designed to help you achieve more balance while creating success in your business.

Good Debt, Bad Debt


“Debt is one person's liability, but another person's asset.” -Paul Krugman, American Economist


By Kathy Longo, CFP®, CAP®, CDFA
Sunday, 17 February 2019

Good Debt, Bad Debt

 

We hear it all the time, everywhere, that Americans have too much debt. The debt of individuals 65 or older has risen 48% between 2003 and 2015.[i] The student loan debt hit $1.53 trillion in 2018.[ii] Americans now also have the highest credit-card debt in U.S. history with over $1 trillion owed.[iii] Considering that household debt hit a record high of $13.5 trillion[iv] you can see we are dragging a lot of debt around with us. What’s important to remember is that not all debt is created equal. In fact, some debt may be good. 


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